New from Del Ben: Primitive Handleless Knife

Del Ben "primitive" handleless knife (courtesy dezeen.com)

Del Ben has released pics of their new Primitive knife, unveiled at the Ambiente trade fair in Frankfurt. Inspired by early hominid tools (our ancestors, not real estate agents waking up in the morning), Italian designer Michele Daneluzzo’s stainless steel kitchen knife is all blade and no handle. Yes, but, can you handle it? According to dezeen.com [which has the pics] ”a subtle ridge runs along the thicker top of the blade to aid grip . . . the shape slims towards the front and bottom to create the sharp cutting edge.” They’re gonna love this in Flint. No word on price or availability, always an issue with Italian companies. Just sayin’ . . .

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7 Responses to New from Del Ben: Primitive Handleless Knife

  1. PMP says:

    The way it’s used kind of reminds me of the Ulu knife used by the native Alaskans. That’s another design that’s quite ancient, yet still finds itself in the hands of modern users.

  2. Mountaingillie says:

    Neat knife. I have used several ulu style “traditional” knives, and found them akward. This seems to blend the best of direct hand contact and a motion more similar to a Chef’s knife.

  3. Mike says:

    Somewhere in Alaska there is a native dude who has butchered countless seals, salmon and caribou, kicking himself as he reads this post. He was just about ready for Shark Tank and then the wife said Mark Cuban wasn’t going to appreciate his primitive genius. Another missed opportunity.

  4. Matt in FL says:

    I think I’d want one, but probably not at the price they’re going to charge.

  5. jwm says:

    Anybody remember the Nat Geo magazine article about the man that crafted a bunch of flint cutting tools based on historic evidence and when he heard of an elephant at a zoo dying of natural causes he asked for and recieved permission to butcher the carcass to test how effective early mans tools where?

    Early man led a survivalist existence and his gear had to work or he died. How well the design will translate into stainless steel, I don’t know. But we’ve had millenia to grow accustomed to knives with seperate handles and blades. Success or failure with this design may simply be a matter of discarding old “prejudices” of what a knife is supposed to be.

    And yes, the flint tools processed dumbo just fine.

  6. Don says:

    Looks really cool but I can’t say I’d want one other than to use as a decoration. I’m a fan of handle technology.

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