Kitchen Knives

Not a DKU: California Castrator Gets ‘Life’ Sentence

Image: Orange County Sheriff

Catherine Kieu, shown here, was convicted last week of drugging her estranged husband’s tofu with sleeping pills, tying him to a bed, and cutting off his gentleman parts with a 10″ kitchen knife. She wanted to be sure the missing member couldn’t be surgically reattached, so she ground it up in the food disposal.

She claimed that this was a defensive knife use, because she had been molested as a child and claimed that her estranged husband had abused her in the past. (Which would make this self-defense how?)

The jury didn’t believe this BS, quickly found her guilty of aggravated mayhem and torture. The judge cited the exceptional cruelty of her actions in handing down the maximum sentence: California’s strange version of ‘life’ in prison. She has already been in jail for nearly two years since the assault, but California law allows her to seek parole in just seven more years.

In the crazy world of California justice, a ‘life’ sentence can apparently be as short as nine years. ‘Life?’ Even housecats live longer than that.

 

Discussion

6 responses to ‘Not a DKU: California Castrator Gets ‘Life’ Sentence

  1. If a husband had drugged, tied-up, and cut-off his wife’s lady-parts you can be sure the sentence would be greater or at least his chances of parole more of an impossibility to achieve than a wife’s. If the reverse situation occurred, the mass media would be covering the tens of thousands or more of California, national, and international protesters demanding his punishment to include castration followed later by execution.

    As to California defining life punishment as 7 or 9 years, I think it has something to do with the “open-minded” California rational insisting that since a body fully replaces all of its cells after about 7 years the person being held is therefore not the same person originally sentenced. Therefore it is not “fair” to keep holding the new person as a prisoner against their will.

  2. They have a choice, when sentencing, of having you serve your various (multiple) convictions *concurrently* or *consecutively*…you really have to make a stir to end up with consecutive sentences. So you can be convicted of say two hundred separate counts of fraud, and serve a total of three years in prison, because all of your sentences are being carried out concurrently.

    ‘Life’ in most states equals 20 years (that’s the actual legal statute, in most states). The average time served on a felony is a month on a year. You get six years sentence, you come up for parole in 6 months. On a Life/20 sentence, you will likely do 20 months in the joint before you come up for parole, and then (assuming you have behaved yourself) you will be released on parole. The exception is Federal crimes (no early release for those) and sex/hate crimes (in most states). For sexual offenses, you are usually required to serve 80% of the sentence before becoming eligible for parole, as well as completing some kind of therapy/reprogramming course. Consecutive sentencing eliminates the ‘early out’ system, but its usually reserved for cases where they **really** want to put you away for your biological lifespan.

    I know its California, but I am really surprised they haven’t given her consecutive sentences and called it a sex offense or hate crime. She would never get out, then. I am assuming that she actually does have a history of abuse, and the prosecution decided to go for some time rather than the maximum, to keep the ‘mentally incompetent’ theme off the table.

  3. I’m reminded of Lorena Bobbitt who cut-off her husband’s peniss years ago. She got a couple months in the nut house for treatment and was then released.

  4. She should have been charged with practicing medicine without a license. She used drugs on him and then performed a sex change operation on him.

    The moral of this story is to not eat tofu. That stuff is bad for you.

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