EDC for CCW

Nuko Tools’ Tactical Butter Knife: You Call That A Knife?

YouTuber ‘Wympyr’ likes edged weapons, and that’s all good. But I think he’s playing a little fast and loose with the facts when he calls this a ‘knife.’ Not to go all Crocodile Dundee on him, but you call that a knife? Au contraire…

Image courtesy Nuko Tools

I’ll concede that it’s made of heat-treated stainless steel, and that it’s got nice textured G10 grips. But steel and G10 do not themselves a knife make, because a knife has to have something we call a blade. Not just some pointy/spiky bits, but one sharp longish bit that can  cut things. Not rip things; cut them.

 

Image courtesy www.thatcable.com

 

For example, this potential weapon has classic wooden grips and lots of steel pointy bits, but we call it a ‘grout trowel’ instead of a knife. If you insist on calling the Tactical Butter Knife a ‘knife,’ you’ll have to call the trowel a ‘dagger.’ It’s not a practical EDC tool, but it’s arguably more EDC-legal than the TBK, which would probably be considered some sort of brass knuckles despite its notable lack of brass.

If you want to test the legal definition of ‘metal knuckles’ in your jurisdiction, or if you’ve got a really small tiling job to grout, you can order the TBK here.

Discussion

7 responses to ‘Nuko Tools’ Tactical Butter Knife: You Call That A Knife?

  1. I agree with your analysis. The proper term for this device is “knuckle duster”. A pretty nice one at that, but unfortunately illegal to carry in most places. This may be why he calls it a “knife”.

  2. $80? Nah.

    Besides, I’ve often heard that having a knife in a fight is largely useless if you don’t also know how to fight. Seems this thing would take that law to the extreme, because if you don’t know how to throw a punch (that connects), this isn’t going to do you any good.

    • I agree with Don and (that other) Matt.

      For that much money, I’d rather have something a bit longer and with a sharp pointy thing on the end, like maybe a spear. Sorry, I mean ‘knife on a stick’. I definitely do not consider that little toy a knife, and I’d rather have a real knife if I’m going to test the DA’s opinion of whether or not its a knife.

      • Hmm, I got:

        there is little money for this great tool
        I’m very satisfied
        really super

        I’m thinking it’s not spam, because there’s no URL in the comment or in the username. I used Google Translate, so it may be wrong, but maybe the first line could mean “This is not a lot of money for this great tool.” Then the whole comment makes sense: “Good value, very satisfied.”

        Whaddya think?

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