Sharpening

Get Scary Sharp With New Ken Onion Work Sharp

Image courtesy www.floridasportsman.comI almost bought a Work Sharp flexible-belt sharpener last month, but opted for a more-traditional Spyderco Sharpmaker instead. I’m glad I didn’t pull the trigger (so to speak) on the base-model Work Sharp, because Darex has been working with Ken Onion to design a professional-grade version.

[UPDATE 10/22/2015: Our full review of the Ken Onion Work Sharp is now online. You can read it here.]

The new $150 Ken Onion Work Sharp includes all the grindy goodness of the standard ($70) Work Sharp shown in this video, but also features adjustable grinding angles, variable speeds, and wider abrasive belts. Basically, everything you need to put exactly the edge you want on your blades.

For those of us who’ll never afford Clay’s pricey¬†Tormek Sharpening Systen, this might be the best automated sharpener out there.

Discussion

17 responses to ‘Get Scary Sharp With New Ken Onion Work Sharp

  1. I’ll stick with the human-powered non-electricity-dependent sharpeners. My (not yet opened) Spyderco Sharpmaker arrived two days ago from Amazon.

  2. I’ve heard more than one report on Blade Forums about people ruining their heat treats from going too fast. I’m not sure what model they were using. I won’t be buying one

  3. I’ve got the original Work Sharp Knife and Tool sharpener, and it works quite well. There are guides for sharpening 20, 25, and 50* angles, as well as scissors.

    This looks like a more refined version, but you can’t go wrong either way.

    Tradition is great and should be kept alive, but technology can be awfully handy. I can run through 3 hunting knives, 3 pocket knives, and a bunch of kitchen knives in 30 minutes. Add in all the garden tools and we’re at an hour.

  4. I’ve been using the same Spydie Sharpmaker since 2001 and it continues to work well on all my knives. The Work Sharp might be nice for re-profiling tho.

  5. Yowza! There are a lot of comments on this one, so I thought a little more info might be helpful:

    1. The fairly high speed of the original Work Sharp belts can reportedly ruin the heat treat of a knife if you don’t follow the directions carefully. One or two quick passes oneach side is supposed to be enough for sharpening; slow or multiple passes can cook the blade.

    2. The flexible abrasive belts on the Work Sharp will also produce a slightly convex grind. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing (such grinds are exceptionally durable) but it would be something to consider.

    3. I’ve used a Work Sharp a few times (I almost bought one) and I don’t think the supplied belts are quite aggressive enough to do the primary grind on a heat-treated knife blank. If you use too rough a belt you risk taking off too much metal, and if the belt isn’t rough enough you’ll risk overheating it because it will take so long.

  6. Geeze does nobody have time anymore to sharpen a blade on a stone? What is the rush? Isn’t it fun to take time and feel the blade against various grit of stone? I ‘m just shaking my head.

  7. I OWN AND OPERATE A DEER PROCESSING PLANT IN AL. WORK SHARP IS MY CHOICE. I SHARPEN 25 PLUS KNIVES A DAY. IN MINUTES MY NEWEST EMPLOYEE CAN SHARPEN HIS OWN KNIFE. I PLAN TO BUY THE KEN ONION EDITION.I RECOMMEND THIS SHARPENER TO MY CUSTOMERS

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