Tacoma Police: Soldier’s Cut Hand Led To Arrest For Stabbing Fellow Soldier

Image: Wikipedia

Some things just make no sense at all. A 23 year-old active duty soldier stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord (above) near Tacoma, Washington is in custody and charged with murder after stabbing a fellow soldier to death in a senseless off-post incident last month.

Equally bizarre and disturbing is the way he was caught: Spc. Jeremiah Hill asked an Army medic for first aid for a knife wound on his right hand the day after the stabbing. When asked how he got the cut, he boasted to the medic that he’d gotten cut “stabbing a man to death.” The medic immediately told his NCO, who immediately called Lakewood, WA detectives.

Hill was questioned and arrested, and two other active-duty soldiers at Lewis-McChord were arrested and charged with evidence tampering after the fact. Despite their alleged efforts to destroy evidence (including getting rid of the murder weapon) the police recovered piles of forensic evidence, including the defendant’s clothes soaked with the victim’s blood.

The incident was originally investigated as a hate crime because witnesses had described the attackers as African-American while the victim, Spc. Tevin Geike, was white. Police no longer believe that race was a motivation for the killing.

We can all be glad that Hill was an amateur knife murderer, although he was unfortunately proficient enough to take Gieke’s life. A more professional killer wouldn’t have cut himself, wouldn’t have bragged about it, and might never have been caught.

Full details at KIRO.com

comments

  1. jwm says:

    A cop I knew in days gone past told me, and my experience working at the prison backs this up, that most criminals aren’t caught because of forensics. They’re caught because they talk about it to others.

    If I was going to commit a major felony I would do it alone and never speak of it again.

    1. Chris Dumm says:

      IIRC, the Stainless Steel Rat only boasted about his crimes once he’d been granted immunity from prosecution, or after the statute of limitations had expired.

      1. jwm says:

        A fictional character confessing to fictional crimes isn’t quite the same as a dumbass bragging about murder. IMHO.

        1. Chris Dumm says:

          So you read them too? Gotcha 🙂

        2. jwm says:

          Google. I was clueless as to who the stainless steel rat was til you mentioned him. My reading is more history oriented.

  2. Nate says:

    This “hate crime” distinction has to go. Murder is pure hate, so why do we try punish people more if they are racist? Isn’t that discrimination onto itself only perpetuating the problem? Murder is murder, the victim is dead and calling it a hate crime because maybe it was racially motivated accomplishes nothing.

    1. ChuckN says:

      I’d also like to see it go; but I wonder how support for
      or against the rule would change if it was applied equally.

    2. jwm says:

      I think the reasoning behind the hate crime charge is that the crime would not have occurred if it had not been racially motivated. In some respects that makes sense. If a man is dragged to death behind a pickup just because of his race, it does indeed fall under the heading of a hate crime.

      Now, If it’s an ordinary crime of oppurtunity like a street robbery then it’s not a hate crime regardless of race of either the aggressor or the victim. The motivation for the crime had nothing to do with race.

  3. don curton says:

    The problem with hate crime is that, to some people, all white on black violence is hate crime while zero black on white violence is hate motivated. If the reverse situation isn’t prosecuted, then the law is biased against white people.

    Also I believe a lot of knife violence results in cut hands to the attacker. Without a proper guard on the hilt your hand (wet with blood) will slide over the blade.

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Tacoma Police: Soldier’s Cut Hand Led To Arrest For Stabbing Fellow Soldier

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