Fixed Blades

EDC For CCW: New Clip-Point Neck Knife From Ka-Bar

 

Image courtesy Knife Center

After years of success with other neck knives by ESEE and Ethan Becker, Ka-Bar has scaled down its famous USMC fighting/utility knife blade and given it a skeletonized handle for neck carry. And darn it, I just bought a Becker Eskabar

Neck knives aren’t permitted in all jurisdictions, but they’ve got a lot of things to recommend them as last-ditch defensive blades where they’re allowed. They’re completely invisible to bystanders and law enforcement when worn under a cover garment. They’re also very quick to access with either your left or right hand, as long as you don’t tuck in your shirt.

They’ve also got drawbacks to consider. They’re slow to re-sheathe, and you’ll need to have both hands free to do it. Neck knives also tend to draw too much attention for routine EDC box-cutting chores, and the sheath string can chafe your neck.

If these are deal-killers, Ka-Bar neck knives also have an optional belt clip for their Kydex sheaths, but of course that turns them into belt knives instead of neck knives.

This baby Ka-Bar is one of the larger neck knives out there, with a four-inch blade that’s almost an exact miniature of the USMC fighting/utility knife. It’s got a clip point with a plain edge and a prominent fuller, made from the same 1095 Cro-Van steel as the original. The flat skeleton grip has a finger choil at the front and jimping at the shoulder for a more secure grip.

Street price for this blade is in the $40-45 range, including the Kydex neck sheath. These knives practically beg to be personalized with handmade scales or paracord wrap. It’s too late (or really really early) for Christmas, but they make excellent gifts for the DIY-inclined knife guy.

And no, I’m not hinting anything to my wife. My birthday isn’t even for seven more months, and (trust me on this) the last thing she’d buy me is another knife.

 

Tags: ,

Discussion

10 responses to ‘EDC For CCW: New Clip-Point Neck Knife From Ka-Bar

    • It’s worn on a cord or chain around your neck. It’s a modern take on the mountain man/indian utility/patch knife from the old days. A big knife on your belt as a sidearm and a small knife for everyday chores.

  1. With practice, many neck knives can be re-sheathed with one hand.
    My CRKT Folts minimalist certainly can.
    As for legal carry, some areas do not allow concealed carry of any knife,
    but are ok with open carry. In these places, neck knives are hard to beat.
    They do attract attention, though. Even my tiny Folts has drawn comment,
    mostly either positive or just curious, but comments and attention nonetheless.

  2. I’ve carried a Brous Silent Soldier every day for 2 months on my belt and have no problem re-sheathing it one-handed unless I’m wearing a backpack. I don’t like neck knives around my neck, but I like the size so I find a way to put them on my belt

  3. I edc a Kabar TDI on my belt, it can be used to stab or slash either forward or reverse grip. This neck knife doesn’t look to have much to grip.

  4. A fixed bladed knife cannot be carried concealed in California. I am pretty sure that LA doesn’t allow belt carry of fixed bladed knives either, and I do know that they ban all knives longer than 3″. [LA really sucks. Under the Penal Code, a knife, fixed or folding, with a blade of 4″ or less, is not a “weapon.” But that doesn’t stop the City of Angels from banning them any way. Bans swords too.]

  5. Definitely seems huge for a neck knife but to each his own!

    The handle design is the same as Kabar’s old Impact series, which came with micarta scales, so I’m sure there are some scales to be had, floating around out there.

    Would make a cool starting point for a DIY handle project!

  6. Just got mine. First day’s impressions: very comfortable to carry, sheath is very secure (steady downward force needed to reelease knife), onehanded resheathing is possible, and the skeletonized handle is a little small but usable. It didn’t come with any chain or cord so you have to provide your own.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *