Axes, Hatchets, & Machetes

Rail-Mounted Bearded Axe Might Be Potentially Useful For Something. But Probably Not.

Image courtesy Melee Mods

Time for a quick poll: other than military bayonet drills, how many of you have ever intentionally attached an edged weapon to a firearm? Unintentionally? I thought so.

If only the dudes at Melee Mods had taken a similar straw poll before launching their $120.00 ‘Tact-Axe’ shown here.

The idea of attaching a knife to a gun is of course not a new one. Bayonets played an important role in combat for many centuries, until the widespread adoption of self-contained metallic ammunition.

The bayonet may still have a place in the hearts of military men and science-fiction writers, but its place as a weapon on the modern battlefield is questionable.

Image courtesy Melee Mods

 

The Melee Mods ‘Tact-Axe’ isn’t even a bayonet, however. Is an AR delta ring or free-float rail even strong enough to absorb the impact of an axe blow? You can test that with your AR,  because mine shoot just fine the way they are.

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Discussion

15 responses to ‘Rail-Mounted Bearded Axe Might Be Potentially Useful For Something. But Probably Not.

  1. “The bayonet may still have a place in the hearts of military men and science-fiction writers, but its place as a weapon on the modern battlefield is questionable.”

    Really?

    From wikipedia.

    “In 1995, during the Siege of Sarajevo, French Marine infantrymen from the 3rd RIMA carried out a bayonet charge against the Serbian forces to regain the Vrbanja bridge.[38] Had they failed to do so, the Serbs could have taken the city.

    The British Army mounted bayonet charges during the Falklands War (see Battle of Mount Tumbledown), the Second Gulf War, and the war in Afghanistan.[39] In 2004 in Iraq at the Battle of Danny Boy, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders bayonet-charged mortar positions filled with over 100 Mahdi Army members. The ensuing hand-to-hand fighting resulted in an estimate of over 40 insurgents killed and 35 bodies collected (many floated down the river) and nine prisoners. Sergeant Brian Wood, of the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, was awarded the Military Cross for his part in the battle.[40]

    British forces in Afghanistan have used bayonets many times. In 2009, Lieutenant James Adamson, aged 24, of the Royal Regiment of Scotland was awarded the Military Cross for a bayonet charge whilst on a tour of duty in Afghanistan: after shooting one Taliban fighter dead Adamson had run out of ammunition when another enemy appeared. He immediately charged the second Taliban fighter and bayoneted him.[41] In September 2012, Lance Corporal Sean Jones of The Princess of Wales’s Regiment was awarded the Military Cross for his role in a bayonet charge which took place in October 2011.”

    I’d kinda expect a website dedicated to edged and bladed tools to know this stuff.
    .

    • I don’t have any numbers to back this up, but I recall more anecdotes of our fighting men using combat knives (or detached bayonets) in CQB than actually using mounted bayonets in the Sandbox.

      You’ve probably done a pretty good job of finding the handful of actions whose outcome depended on the bayonet. But there have been literally tens of thousands of small-unit engagements involving friendly forces in the last twenty years, which means that the bayonet’s operational significance is statistically just about zero.

      Attaching a bayonet makes a rifle less maneuverable in combat and more hazardous when riding in or exiting vehicles. It also changes a rifle’s zero when fired at longer distances.

      I haven’t re-read them in many years, but Gordon R. Dickson and Robert A. Heinlein were both inordinately fond of the bayonet and combat knife, IIRC. Dickson served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and Heinlein served as a naval officer in the 1930s. Hardly the age of mechanized infantry and precision-guided weapons.

      Joe Haldeman has much more recent military service. He was a combat engineer, wounded in combat in Vietnam, and his military sci-fi works don’t talk about bayonets much. Swords and spears get more treatment in his masterpiece ‘The Forever War’ than bayonets do.

  2. I keep thinking about buying a Hi-Point, or similar cheap firearm, just to do silly stuff like this with.

    On the other hand, if you could attach it without cutting your hand off, that would probably make for a butt-stroke from hell. Granted, a metal stud or plate would probably be significantly more practical.

  3. I have the long bayonet for my Garand and put a lug on the RPK so it accepts a M7. Bayonet is like a parachute, when you need one you need immediately and desperately.

    As for obsolescence, I believe David Bellavia mentions bayonets being used during the taking of Fallujah. Bayonet charge? No thanks. Not unless you got surprise and are close enough to close right behind a grenade volley. And as for riot control nothing moves people like sharp steel. Well, other than gun fire, that is.

  4. there was a time when I really wanted to put a bayonet on my shotgun… thank goodness I grew up. and I didn’t want my gunsmith to think I was a damn fool

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