Swords

1,000 year old viking sword found by Icelandic goose-hunters

That was a headline that was fun to write.

Archaeological discovery is often a matter of serendipity. The famous “Lucy” skeleton was almost stepped on -but they were at least looking for it. A group of Icelandic goose-hunters made the most of an otherwise lackluster day of hunting by accidentally discovering a 1,000 year old Viking sword, just lying on the ground.

From Vintage News:

The group of five hunters were trying to hunt geese in the southern Icelandic region of Skaftarhreppur when they made the historic discovery. Experts believe that the sword had actually spent centuries under water and only arrived on land due to the massive floods that hit the region last year.

Excited by their discovery anticipating fame and possibly a handsome reward one of the hunters Arni Bjorn quickly posted the images of the Viking sword on his Facebook page. Bjorn made the claim that the double-edged sword may have once belonged to Ingolfr Arnarson.

Those who are familiar with the Viking history of Iceland know this name very well, as Arnarson is widely recognized as the first ever Icelander and the person who set up the first settlement on the Iceland more than a thousand years ago. Another member of the hunting party commented that the legendary sword was not buried deep under the soil it was rather just lying there waiting to be picked up, and that they felt extremely honored to have found the artefact.

When I was doing fieldwork at Koobi Fora, Kenya, we often would just walk along eroded hillsides looking for the fossil skull that would make our career, just as the Leakey family had in those very hills. None of us got so lucky.

Prospecting for fossils, Koobi Fora, Kenya

Discussion

3 responses to ‘1,000 year old viking sword found by Icelandic goose-hunters

  1. Just washed up,Ehh? Well the rust looks authentic, like to see pix of the entire piece. Hmm, I wonder where some of my blades will be in 1000 years? They won’t rust, handles are indestructible. So, Knifemakers, do your best work and maybe in a thousand years…

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